Vestibular Testing, Exercises & Therapies

Vestibular Rehabilitation

Our board certified clinicians & vestibular therapists are here to help.

They provide comprehensive vestibular testing, exercises & therapies to individuals that are suffering with dizziness, vertigo, blurry vision, eye fatigue and more.

Welcome to Burlington's Leading-Edge Vestibular Rehabilitation Clinic!

At our advanced facility, we are dedicated to providing exceptional care and support to individuals seeking relief from vestibular disorders. Our team of highly skilled and experienced professionals is committed to helping you regain your balance and improve your quality of life.

 

With the latest technology and evidence-based treatment approaches, we tailor our services to meet your specific needs, ensuring you receive the best possible care. Whether you’re struggling with vertigo, dizziness, or any other vestibular condition, you can trust us to guide you on your journey to recovery.

 

Step into our clinic, and let us help you regain your stability and confidence in every step you take. Your well-being is our top priority, and we look forward to working with you to achieve lasting results. Welcome to a brighter future with Burlington’s leading Vestibular Rehabilitation Clinic!

Vestibular System, Diagnosis, and Treatment

Our vestibular system is responsible for delivering information to our brain about motion, head positioning and spatial orientation.

Individuals that are suffering from a vestibular disorder will often experience symptoms related to vertigo, dizziness, migraines, blurry vision, double vision, reading difficulties, etc.

 

This is not a problem with vision, but the areas of the brain that control the stability and integration of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR).

 

The VOR is responsible for stabilizing our gaze during head movements. 

Vestibular patient performing task during VNG testing

What Is A Vestibular System?

The vestibular system is a network of sensory organs that provides a sense of balance and orientation. The vestibular apparatus in the inner ear makes up our sense of balance. Additionally, visual, somatosensory, and neck-muscle proprioceptive inputs also play a role. 

 

This system is responsible for helping to maintain balance and spatial orientation while standing, walking, and in other postural activities. Dysfunction of this system can result in dizziness, vertigo, nausea, blurred vision, eye fatigue, and other balance and orientation problems. 

 

The vestibular system plays a vital role in keeping our posture and controlling our eye movements. However, we usually do not realize its importance.

What Are Symptoms Of A Vestibular Disorder?

People with vestibular disorders often have vestibular dysfunction. Symptoms can include:

  • Vertigo
  • Dizziness
  • Migraines
  • Light-headedness
  • Balance and hearing problems
  • Blurred vision
  • Double vision
  • Motion sensitivity
  • Nausea
  • Difficulty reading

Although it does affect the sight, this is not a problem with vision. Instead, it is affecting the areas of the brain that control the stability and integration of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR). The VOR is responsible for stabilizing our gaze during head movements, which is why this will be affected.

 

This system is responsible for helping to maintain balance and spatial orientation while standing, walking, and in other postural activities. Dysfunction of this system can result in dizziness, vertigo, nausea, blurred vision, eye fatigue, and other balance and orientation problems. 

 

The vestibular system plays a vital role in keeping our posture and controlling our eye movements. However, we usually do not realize its importance.

What Is Dizziness And Why Is Balance Important?

Dizziness is caused by disruption to your spatial orientation. This is the brain’s capacity to determine your body’s position in relation to your surroundings. This can cause lightheadedness, wooziness, and a sensation of instability. Additionally, you may lose your sense of balance.

 

Your ability to maintain balance is dependent on the correlation between your central nervous system (i.e. brain) and your sensory system, which comprises of: 

  • The vestibular labyrinth, located in the inner ear, comprises the semicircular canals and otolith organs. These organs respond to head movements and changes in gravity and movement, respectively. 
  • Meanwhile, the eyes provide the brain with impulses that help determine the body’s position in relation to objects. 
  • In addition, the skin, joints, and muscles send signals to the brain when the body moves, indicating its position in space. 

 

The central nervous system gathers information and uses it to instruct the body on how to maintain balance. If the system’s connection is disrupted, the information processing abilities of the central nervous system are affected.

Patient undergoing VNG testing for vestibular assessment

Vestibular Rehabilitation and Treatment

There are numerous types and causes of vestibular based problems; if left untreated, many vestibular patients can suffer devastating and debilitating consequences.

What Is Vestibular Rehab?

The basis of a vestibular rehab program is to use the already existing neural pathways for adaptation, plasticity, and compensation in the human brain.

 

A comprehensive Videonystagmography (VNG) is performed to determine the specific nature of the vestibular dysfunction. These results are used to develop an individualized treatment plan.

The Benefits of Vestibular Rehab

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Vestibular Conditions We See

We rehabilitate a wide range of conditions that can result in vertigo,
dizziness and imbalance—including, but not limited to:
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Patient with Post-Concussion Syndrome receiving vagus nerve stimulation with a moving optokinetic background and balance training.

What Vestibular Rehab Treatments Are Available?

The vestibular function treatments involve exercises to improve balance and coordination. These include standing on one leg, walking in a straight line, and other activities. All of these are designed to improve the patient’s balance and coordination. 

 

Gaze stabilization exercises involve wearing a device that stimulates the vestibular system. Examples of this device include a headband that vibrates or rotates the head. This helps the brain and nervous system adjust to the new balance information. 

 

Vestibular rehabilitation therapy (VRT) includes making lifestyle changes. This includes avoiding activities that can cause dizziness or imbalance and it is also important to get enough rest. 

 

With proper treatment, vestibular rehabilitation can help improve balance and reduce dizziness. If left untreated, many vestibular patients can suffer devastating and debilitating consequences.

 

Vestibular rehabilitation therapy has multiple benefits. It works to re-establish connections and improve the patient’s quality of life. It also reduces the risk of long-term complications from their vestibular disorder. This ultimately leads to a reduction in dizziness and balance-related symptoms.

How Do We Determine And Test For Vestibular Dysfunction?

We need you to give us a thorough explanation of your symptoms including what makes them worse or better, when they first appeared, changes that have happened over time, your medical history, and how it affects your day-to-day life. This will help us understand your condition better. 

A comprehensive Videonystagmography (VNG) is performed to determine the specific nature of the vestibular dysfunction. 

 

Neurological tests can be useful in identifying the cause of vestibular and concussion dysfunctions. These dysfunctions are often linked to the nervous system. These tests involve simple arm and leg movements. They also examine the muscles, reflexes, and voluntary eye movements of the head.

 

These results are then used to develop an individualized treatment plan. The amount of treatments needed differs based on the diagnosis and the individual patient. After your assessment, your vestibular therapists will have the information they need. They will use it to discuss your prognosis and estimate how many sessions you will need.

Can Vestibular Rehabilitation Help Me?

If you are suffering and experiencing some of the symptoms as listed above, the answer is…. YES!

 

Located in Burlington our Functional Neurology & Vestibular Rehabilitation clinic has been helping clients for over ten years.